Virtual radioactive dating lab thermoluminescence dating artifact exchange links

The Carbon-14 method measures the amount of radioactive carbon-14 in a previously living artifact.From this information, scientists can accurately infer the age of the test material.You will investigate Steno's Laws, radiometric dating, and then visit an interactive site that will help you better understand how to tell time - with geology! As you proceed through Assignment 4, be sure to compare your answers from "If Scientists Think. ." to the actual methods scientists use to estimate the age of prehistoric objects.Because this assignment is linked with your work in Assignment 3, you will have "If Scientists Think. Before scientists had modern technology to assist them in their research, they had to use their power of observation to infer the relative ages of the rocks they were studying.The process of Relative Dating was established by Nicholaus Steno in the 1600's.Steno developed a set of Laws (Steno's Laws) to help explain his method of inferring the ages of geological structures.

By looking at layers of rocks, scientists can tell which layers are older or newer than others; however, they can not tell exactly how old these layers are.

Water samples should be stored in inert plastic bottles with tightly sealed screw tops and a negligible air gap.

Samples are normally taken within the laboratory where we have all the necessary facilities.

Continue to the Radiometric Dating portion of this assignment through use of a virtual web site.

Answer the questions about each aspect of radiometric dating as you move through the various exercises of the Radiometric Dating Lab.

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