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SELECT d.department_name, e.last_name, e.salary , ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY e.department_id ORDER BY e.salary) AS rownumber , RANK() OVER ( PARTITION BY e.department_id ORDER BY e.salary) AS rank , DENSE_RANK() OVER ( PARTITION BY e.department_id ORDER BY e.salary) AS drank FROM employees e, departments d WHERE e.department_id = d.department_id AND d.department_id IN ('20','30', '40') ORDER BY d.department_name, e.salary, e.last_name, rank; DEPARTMENT LAST_NAME SALARY ROWNUMBER RANK DRANK ---------- ---------- ------- ---------- ----- ----- Human Reso Mavris 6500 1 1 1 Marketing Fay 6000 1 1 1 Marketing Hartstein 13000 2 2 2 Purchasing Colmenares 2500 1 1 1 Purchasing Himuro 2600 2 2 2 Purchasing Baida 2900 3 3 3 Purchasing Tobias 2900 4 3 3 Purchasing Khoo 3100 5 5 4 Purchasing Raphaely 11000 6 6 5 9 rows selected.Summary: in this tutorial, you will learn about another named PL/SQL block called an Oracle trigger.And then OVER this subset of your data, the ROW_NUMBER function is executed, resulting in a rownumbering foreach item in the subset of data.Notice in the Row Num result that all numbers are unique for a department.Using the SCOTT schema, for each employee we want to know how many other people are in their department. -- Non-ANSI Syntax SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc.dept_count AS emp_dept_count FROM emp e, (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc WHERE e.deptno = dc.deptno; -- ANSI Syntax SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc.dept_count AS emp_dept_count FROM emp e JOIN (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc ON e.deptno = dc.deptno; -- Non-ANSI Syntax WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc.dept_count AS emp_dept_count FROM emp e, dept_count dc WHERE e.deptno = dc.deptno; -- ANSI Syntax WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc.dept_count AS emp_dept_count FROM emp e JOIN dept_count dc ON e.deptno = dc.deptno; The difference seems rather insignificant here.What if we also want to pull back each employees manager name and the number of people in the managers department? -- Non-ANSI Syntax SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc1.dept_count AS emp_dept_count, m.ename AS manager_name, dc2.dept_count AS mgr_dept_count FROM emp e, (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc1, emp m, (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc2 WHERE e.deptno = dc1.deptno AND = m.empno AND m.deptno = dc2.deptno; -- ANSI Syntax SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc1.dept_count AS emp_dept_count, m.ename AS manager_name, dc2.dept_count AS mgr_dept_count FROM emp e JOIN (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc1 ON e.deptno = dc1.deptno JOIN emp m ON = m.empno JOIN (SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) dc2 ON m.deptno = dc2.deptno; -- Non-ANSI Syntax WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc1.dept_count AS emp_dept_count, m.ename AS manager_name, dc2.dept_count AS mgr_dept_count FROM emp e, dept_count dc1, emp m, dept_count dc2 WHERE e.deptno = dc1.deptno AND = m.empno AND m.deptno = dc2.deptno; -- ANSI Syntax WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT e.ename AS employee_name, dc1.dept_count AS emp_dept_count, m.ename AS manager_name, dc2.dept_count AS mgr_dept_count FROM emp e JOIN dept_count dc1 ON e.deptno = dc1.deptno JOIN emp m ON = m.empno JOIN dept_count dc2 ON m.deptno = dc2.deptno; WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT /* MATERIALIZE */ deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT ...-- DROP TABLE EMP PURGE; -- DROP TABLE DEPT PURGE; CREATE TABLE DEPT ( DEPTNO NUMBER(2) CONSTRAINT PK_DEPT PRIMARY KEY, DNAME VARCHAR2(14), LOC VARCHAR2(13) ) ; CREATE TABLE EMP ( EMPNO NUMBER(4) CONSTRAINT PK_EMP PRIMARY KEY, ENAME VARCHAR2(10), JOB VARCHAR2(9), MGR NUMBER(4), HIREDATE DATE, SAL NUMBER(7,2), COMM NUMBER(7,2), DEPTNO NUMBER(2) CONSTRAINT FK_DEPTNO REFERENCES DEPT ); INSERT INTO DEPT VALUES (10,'ACCOUNTING','NEW YORK'); INSERT INTO DEPT VALUES (20,'RESEARCH','DALLAS'); INSERT INTO DEPT VALUES (30,'SALES','CHICAGO'); INSERT INTO DEPT VALUES (40,'OPERATIONS','BOSTON'); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7369,'SMITH','CLERK',7902,to_date('','dd-mm-yyyy'),800, NULL,20); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7499,'ALLEN','SALESMAN',7698,to_date('20-2-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),1600,300,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7521,'WARD','SALESMAN',7698,to_date('22-2-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),1250,500,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7566,'JONES','MANAGER',7839,to_date('2-4-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),2975, NULL,20); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7654,'MARTIN','SALESMAN',7698,to_date('28-9-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),1250,1400,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7698,'BLAKE','MANAGER',7839,to_date('1-5-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),2850, NULL,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7782,'CLARK','MANAGER',7839,to_date('9-6-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),2450, NULL,10); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7788,'SCOTT','ANALYST',7566,to_date('13-JUL-87','dd-mm-rr')-85,3000, NULL,20); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7839,'KING','PRESIDENT', NULL,to_date('','dd-mm-yyyy'),5000, NULL,10); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7844,'TURNER','SALESMAN',7698,to_date('8-9-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),1500,0,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7876,'ADAMS','CLERK',7788,to_date('13-JUL-87', 'dd-mm-rr')-51,1100, NULL,20); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7900,'JAMES','CLERK',7698,to_date('3-12-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),950, NULL,30); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7902,'FORD','ANALYST',7566,to_date('3-12-1981','dd-mm-yyyy'),3000, NULL,20); INSERT INTO EMP VALUES (7934,'MILLER','CLERK',7782,to_date('23-1-1982','dd-mm-yyyy'),1300, NULL,10); COMMIT; clause, or subquery factoring clause, is part of the SQL-99 standard and was added into the Oracle SQL syntax in Oracle 9.2.

Note that if a trigger is disabled, it is not fired when the triggering event occurs.WITH dept_count AS ( SELECT /* INLINE */ deptno, COUNT(*) AS dept_count FROM emp GROUP BY deptno) SELECT ...WITH dept_costs AS ( SELECT dname, SUM(sal) dept_total FROM emp e, dept d WHERE e.deptno = d.deptno GROUP BY dname), avg_cost AS ( SELECT SUM(dept_total)/COUNT(*) avg FROM dept_costs) SELECT * FROM dept_costs WHERE dept_total SELECT value FROM v$diag_info WHERE name = 'Default Trace File'; VALUE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/cdb1/cdb1/trace/cdb1_ora_4278SQL The following abbreviated output shows some points of interest in the resulting trace file.The advantage of the latter is that repeated references to the subquery may be more efficient as the data is easily retrieved from the temporary table, rather than being requeried by each reference.You should assess the performance implications of the clause can be used to reduce repetition and simplify complex SQL statements.

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